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Hospital to break ground next Monday

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The Holyoke Enterprise
Written by Holyoke Enterprise

Hospital to break ground next Monday

Melissa Memorial Hospital plans to have a ceremony to commence the master facility building project Monday, Oct. 12, at 1 p.m. on the west side of the building near Holyoke Family Practice.

A brief groundbreaking ceremony outside followed by light snacks and beverages in the group room will celebrate the culmination and hard work of East Phillips County Hospital District board members, former CEO John Ayoub, the Neenan Company, interim CEO Jim Murphy, interim CFO Jason McCormick, and many other countless staff and community members that supported the expansion.

The new expansion is a way to meet the present and future needs of patients and the community as MMH continually strives to provide excellent care. The project is to be the final stage of Melissa Memorial’s master facility plan.

Exciting details of the new project will include a specialty clinic and family practice expansion, a new on-site residence, an enclosed ambulance drop-off area, an on-site ambulance storage shed, a new lab entrance, new space for offices, and improved areas for helistop, parking and drives.

Speciality clinic and family practice expansion
Since moving into the new building in 2008, the speciality clinic has experienced a 50 percent increase in visits. A brand-new addition to the west side of the building will better utilize the growing facility.

This will allow for increased patient visits, visiting specialists in the speciality clinic and increased numbers of providers with a team-based care approach in family practice.

New on-site residence
An on-site residence will allow for maximized possibilities of a potential rural residency program. It will provide safe, secure, comfortable and convenient housing for traveling specialty providers and their families.

It will be more efficient in utilizing the hospital’s utilities and housekeeping services as MMH consolidates its properties to a campus-like setting.

Enclosed ambulance drop-off area
An enclosed ambulance drop-off area will improve patient comfort and safety despite Mother Nature’s harsh elements. It will also provide additional areas for improved decontamination resources and documentation areas for staff, along with storage for supplies and training equipment.

On-site ambulance storage shed
A new on-site ambulance storage shed will provide faster daytime access for emergency responses, along with easier access for maintenance and additional storage.

New lab entrance and new space for offices
A new additional entrance to the laboratory will be more convenient for patients. Some existing space will also be repurposed for offices and patient/family consultation.

Improved helistop, parking and drives
New helistop, parking and drives will increase accessibility to the hospital and provide convenient parking.

The project is estimated to cost $4.9 million. First Pioneer National Bank will finance $2 million, and the rest will be paid from savings.

The Neenan Company is the architectural design company that has been working on the design plans. The company specializes in hospital design and meeting crucial building codes for the health care industry.

Parking and patient services will not be interrupted during this time. The building project is anticipated to be complete by June or July of 2016.

For more information, visit www.melissamemorial.org.

Neenan in development mode with multitenant project

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October 7-October 20,2015 – Colorado Real Estate Journal – Page 13
Larimer & Weld Counties

Neenan in development mode with multitenant project

by Jill Jamieson-Nichols

VALUE

The Neenan Co. is back in development mode with redevelopment of the former Value Plastics building in Fort Collins.

The project at 3325 S. Timberline Road is the first since the company completed the OnCore Manufacturing Services building in Longmont in 2011. Neenan specializes in industrial, medical and office build-to-suits for clients.

The Neenan Co. designed the Value Plastics building in 1995 and recently purchased it for $3.66 million for conversion from industrial to multitenant office space. Completetion is anticipated in January.

The building contains 29,000 sf of the first floor and 10,500 sf on the second floor.

“We’re excited to expand the firm’s focus and return to our offering of real estate development services,” said David Shigekane, The Neenan Co. president. “With the market conditions continuing to improve,  this is the ideal time to engage with clients on high-caliber development projects.”

The Neenan Co. began providing development services in 1981 and has owned or co-owned more than 40 properties. Its projects include the Redstone Professional Office Building on Poudre Valley Health System’s Harmony Campus, Melco Industries in Westminster and Avista Medical Plaza in Louisville, including the Avista I and II medical office buildings.

Rural rivals create award-winning partnership

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Rural Roads Online | bridges | Fall 2015

Rural rivals create award-winning partnership

How cooperation cured health centers

By Lauren Donovan

RR1
Sakakawea Medical Center board president Christie Obenauer and chief administrator Darrold Bertsch say the cure for what ailed local health institutions was cooperation. They and Coal Country Community Health Center share NRHA’s Outstanding Rural Health Organization honor.

Two of rural North Dakota’s rival health centers have teamed up to learn they feel better together than apart.

Neither the Sakakawea Medical Center in Hazen nor the Coal Country Community Health Center in Beulah was terminally ill, but competition instead of cooperation was weakening their bottom lines.

The diagnosis was obvious enough, but it was the cure that took some doing.

Starting four years ago, the two flagship medical entities began discussing the novel idea of talking to each other.

A fresh, healthy mindset blew in, and in April the two entities received a coveted award from the National Rural Health Association.

NRHA’s Outstanding Rural Health Organization award recognized the two as one, though technically each is still operated separately.

It’s where they’ve come together that’s been financially healing and given them the distinction of being the only hospital-clinic combination in the country to do so.

 

“If what we do is to benefit the community we can’t go wrong.”

—Christie Obenauer, Sakakawea Medical Center board president

 

Darrold Bertsch, who started as chief administrator of the Hazen hospital, now splits his time doing the same for the Beulah clinic.

The clinic operates under Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) funding guidelines that are tilted toward low-income and underserved populations and require that the top administrator be a clinic employee.

Christie Obenauer, hospital board president, says it took some doing to persuade HRSA to go along with sharing the administrator of a critical access hospital, but, after seeing and believing, the agency recently signed an agreement formalizing the arrangement.

“Nobody else is doing this right now. Now, they’re seeing that this could be a model,” Obenauer adds.

Besides sharing an administrator, the boards of each entity have two mutual members. Talk at the board tables helps avoid expensive redundancies, such as $500,000 CT scanners each one had at one time, and find ways to be more efficient.

 

“There had been a huge left-hand-didn’t-know-what-the-right-hand-was-doing effect.”

—Aaron Garman, Coal Country Community Health Center medical director

RR2 RR3
Coal County Community Health
Care medical director
Aaron Garmon.
Beulah clinic board
president DJ Erickson

 

“Health care is constantly shape-shifting, and now it’s all about prevention. It’s cool to be able to do that. No one is on an island. As a community member is diagnosed with something, there’s the involvement of more people,” Obenauer says.

DJ Erickson, Beulah clinic board president, says the arrangement is not only good for the communities, but it’s a relief to step back from the infighting that had characterized relations for so long.

He adds that Bertsch is getting the job done for both entities, and morale has improved.

“Each has a core team of managers, and they’re doing the work now that they should have been doing,” Erickson says.

Aaron Garman, the clinic’s medical director, says the arrangement prevents competition that can be unhealthy, especially when the communities are relatively small.

“There had been a huge left-hand-didn’t-know-what-the-right-hand- was-doing effect,” Garman says.

Today, the hospital and clinic boards are striving for the benefit of both, sharing resources and training and even bouncing health care  providers back and forth as needed, he says.

Bertsch says the result is the hospital and clinic have a much improved cash-on-hand status and have collectively gone from 2.2 percent in the red to 11 percent as a net margin of profitability.

Garman and Obenauer agree wellness for a community is easier now that the gloves are off and hands are clasped.

“If what we do is to benefit the community—if we do that—we can’t go wrong,” Obenauer says.


Watch and learn

View the health centers’ Outstanding Rural Health Organization award acceptance video and many more at youtube.com/NRHAhealth.

And discover other effective rural partnerships and strategies for financial and clinical success at the National Rural Health Association’s Rural Health Clinic (Sept. 29-30-Oct 2) Conferences in Kansas City.

Visit RuralHealthWeb.org/kc for the full agendas and to register.


 

This article originally appeared in The Bismarck Tribune on April 19, 2015

Transforming health care from the inside out

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Health Facilities Management

Transforming health care from the inside out

by Miguel Burbano de Lara, AIA, NCARB

Three strategies that incorporate facility design to help deliver better care at lower cost

0915_innovation1_605
Photo courtesy of the Neenan Co.
HealthProMed’s new 44,200-sq. ft. clinic addresses critical service gaps in an underserved neighborhood, where patients traditionally obtained care in the hospital emergency department by providing access to expanded care services.

In the United States, the health care system has evolved based on insurers’ reimbursement protocols. In the past, insurers’ reimbursements typically followed a simple formula: the higher the acuity level of the health care setting, the higher the reimbursement. As a result, episodic illness — in many cases, the result of chronic conditions like high blood pressure, heart disease and diabetes — often was treated in the inpatient setting. Over time, this health care delivery model turned hospitals into “profit centers.”

Over the past few years, this delivery model has changed dramatically as acute care costs increased and associated insurance reimbursements decreased. Health care organizations have responded by analyzing specific market needs and adjusting their supply channels to meet patients’ needs at the most appropriate care setting — a hospital, clinic, primary care physician’s office or one or more specialist offices. And they are increasing their focus on prevention, community health and wellness to reduce the incidence of disease.

Truly innovative health care organizations are taking a step further, employing information technology and facility design to support new models of patient care. Their goal is to transform health care services delivery – ensuring better access to care, increased quality and safety, and better outcomes for their patients; essentially, improved operational efficiency and reduced cost for their organizations. And many are succeeding.

Here is a closer look at three key strategies used by health care innovators to achieve this transformational goal: shifting care from inpatient to outpatient environments; patient-centric, wellness solutions; and the application of hospitality and Lean enterprise concepts and digital modeling to redefine health care operations and redesign facilities.

Shifting care from the hospital and emergency department to outpatient environments

Hospitals are anchored in tradition and process. Health care organizations must make strategic and operational changes to enable the shift to non-acute patient care, when medically appropriate, from the hospital to outpatient environments. They must analyze the unique needs of each of their markets and deploy their resources accordingly.

Payment, technology and patient-access forces have powered this change. In particular, the high costs of emergency department (ED) visits for routine care and in-hospital surgery admissions for noncomplex procedures are the impetus for the rise of urgent care centers and the accelerated growth of outpatient surgery centers. In both instances, payment structures are motivators; additionally, innovation in technology, care protocols and facility design enable the shift. Changes in physician referral strategies and patients’ improved service access have contributed to making the shift possible.

For example, HealthProMed built a new outpatient urgent care clinic in San Juan, Puerto Rico, with the specific goal of addressing critical service gaps in an underserved neighborhood, where patients traditionally obtained care in the hospital ED. A review of the data indicated that a vast majority of the hospital’s ED visits could have been treated in an outpatient setting, underscoring the waste of professional resources and the exorbitant cost of delivering primary and urgent care in an acute care setting.

Patients also have access to expanded care services at the new 44,200-sq. ft. clinic, including primary care, diagnostics, lab, dental and mental health services. Wellness and health education programs were also introduced to help patients prevent illness and manage common chronic conditions like high blood pressure, heart disease and diabetes.

HealthProMed’s performance data are evidence of the benefits:

  • The number of patient visits has increased from approximately 50,000 to 75,000.
  • The number of patients served has increased from 14,000 to 16,000.
  • The number of providers has increased from 10 to 15.
  • The number of staff supporting wellness and education programs has increased from 15 to 25.

Patient-centric solutions: the patient-centered medical home and wellness model

Health care organizations are shifting from provider-centric to patient-centric models of care. The patient-centered medical home is a way of organizing primary care that emphasizes effective communication among patients and caregivers and coordination of all facets of a patient’s care. Medical homes have the potential to provide higher-quality care at lower costs, and to improve the experience of care for both patients and providers.

0915_innovation3_350
Photo courtesy of the Neenan Co.
Sutter Gould Medical Foundation’s Turlock Care Center operates on the principles of a patient-centered medical home. The care center offers urgent care, family medicine, internal medicine, pediatrics, specialty care, radiology and laboratory services.

A patient-centric medical facility locates patient registration and discharge at the point of care and not at the front desk. Similarly, it brings services like phlebotomy, ultrasound and portable diagnostic imaging to the patient instead of sending the patient out for these services.

This model requires a reorganization of the traditional roles and responsibilities into a collaborative care team, which integrates health care providers and support staff under new protocols, responsibilities and tasks. The care team model reduces the number of staff positions, including appointment scheduling, reception and discharge, increasing efficiency and reducing costs. More importantly, it enables comprehensive coordination of the patient’s care along the entire continuum of care — over time, among various places of service, and among various providers — and introduces new health education, wellness and counseling programs.

Effective use of electronic health records (EHRs), other digital technologies and performance metrics support this operational shift. These new tools are transforming health care delivery from patient access and diagnostic testing to generation of billing and performance metrics.

A patient call center or service portal (accessed by telephone, often via a toll-free number, or via the Web) is essential for this new operational model, serving to integrate appointments, medical records, triage, performance metrics and communication processes. Access to digital information enhances productivity and transparency. The new electronic data bank is HIPAA-compliant and satisfies portability needs.

These tools and processes also create vastly different patient and staff flows, which require innovative space solutions.

For example, the Sutter Gould Medical Foundation’s Turlock (Calif.) Care Center, which opened in August 2014, operates on the principles of a patient-centered medical home. The care center offers urgent care, family medicine, internal medicine, pediatrics, specialty care, radiology and laboratory services.

The Turlock Care Center optimizes the use of EHR technology, Lean workflow processes and architectural solutions that sustain care team operations, including the concentrated point-of-care approach. Digital tools continue to be introduced to improve diagnostic and treatment protocols.

The Turlock Care Center is supported by a central patient navigation and information center, which is staffed at 0.5 per provider. Compared with the traditional distributed appointment system and patient triage/information center, the patient call center is a far more efficient way to manage patient flow and pre-visit and post-visit data.

Applying hospitality and Lean enterprise concepts and digital modeling to redefine health care

Sutter Gould Medical Foundation is projecting improvements in the application of hospitality and Lean enterprise concepts and digital modeling to redefine health care operations and redesign facilities.

As part of the transformation of health care into a patient-centered, efficient process, innovative health care organizations have adopted best practices from the hospitality industry and Lean enterprises.

0915_innovation2_350
Photo courtesy of the Neenan Co.
The Turlock Care Center optimizes the use of electronic health record technology, Lean workflow processes, and architectural solutions that sustain care team operations.

The hospitality industry is a worldwide leader in customer focus and guest satisfaction. It has created customer-centered services, as well as expanded guest services menus, such as cafeteria, fitness, office center and concierge. The industry also has introduced architectural and interior design innovations to improve the guest experience, including universal access (for able-bodied and disabled guests), better wayfinding, greater privacy and comfort, broadband digital connections and environmental sustainability.

Innovative health care organizations are adopting many of these hospitality concepts to increase market share and improve patient satisfaction.

The Lean enterprise movement, which originated in the automobile manufacturing industry, has swept across all industries, and has applied the concepts to eliminate all forms of waste and achieve continuous improvement in performance. As a result, they have increased efficiency, profitability and customer satisfaction.

Innovative health care systems are applying Lean concepts through digital modeling technology to redefine operations and redesign facilities. Digital modeling enables 3-D visualization of facility design and operational variables, such as patient flow and physician/staff workflow, and quantify (4-D and 5-D) the effects of design and operational alternatives on their objectives. These organizations are finding many opportunities to use modeling and the associated performance data harvested from models.  These include: anticipating the impact of moving from paper to digital work environments; testing and improving building performance and sustainability (e.g., energy efficiency); assessing staffing needs and redefining skill sets; and developing efficient just-in-time supply chain processes.

Hospital leaders have used Lean concepts and digital modeling to redefine their organizations and work processes and redesign facilities to support their migration from the traditional distributed model — a private office, exam room(s) and medical assistant for each physician — to a collaborative, care team model, achieving the objectives for safety, quality, access, efficiency and cost as a result.

For example, St. John’s Clinic in Rolla, Mo., built a new three-story, 106,862-sq. ft. outpatient facility to house a multispecialty clinic practice, an ambulatory surgery center and other outpatient services. They collaborated with their design-build team in applying Lean concepts and modeling tools to support the transformation of the traditional provider-centric operations into a patient-centered care team model and to design a facility that supports the new operations. Innovations included elimination of private physician offices as well as the reception and the waiting room, while adding in shared provider work spaces, and point-of-care patient registration, services and discharge.

St. John’s performance data show the gains in productivity and efficiency compared with that of a traditional model:

  • Overall building: total space reduction of 13 percent (from 124,167 sq. ft. to 106,862 sq. ft.)
  • Overall clinic space: reduction of 20 percent (from 76,945 sq. ft. to 61,113 sq. ft.)
  • Initial construction savings: $3.8 million
  • Overall capacity: increase of 16 percent (from supporting 49 providers to supporting 57 providers)
  • Annual rent savings: approximately $450,000
  • Annual operational savings: approximately $183,000
  • Annual savings per provider: approximately $3,400 per provider per year
  • 50 percent increase in recruiting success

It’s not just about cost

With total U.S. health care expenditures above 17 percent of the gross domestic product, American health care innovators have developed and applied these three strategies out of economic necessity to deliver health care at a lower cost. But as these strategies are put into place, health care innovators have seen improvement in quality, safety and patient satisfaction by increasing health care access, expanding services and growing capacity.

Miguel Burbano de Lara, AIA, NCARB, served as AIA Colorado North Chapter president in 2005 and is a member of many professional and civic organizations. He has worked at the Neenan Co. since 1999, where he focuses on Lean theory, design innovation and accelerated delivery. For more information, visit www.neenan.com.

The new hospital is a great addition to Prineville

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The new hospital is a great addition to Prineville

|

The veil was lifted from the St. Charles Prineville hospital this past weekend, and at first glance, the new facility is first rate and should serve the community well in the years ahead.

The “Sneak Peek” comes nine days before the hospital officially opens its doors to patients, and when that day comes, residents in need of medical care will go from an aging 65-year-old facility with an outdated floor plan, to a new building that was designed with the intent of providing the most modern methods of health care and focusing on patient space.

Hospital CEO Jeanie Gentry proudly showed off the 36-room family clinic that meets people just inside the front door. She stressed that designers emphasized patient space over administrative and physician office space. Because medicine is now a team effort, rather than a single physician caring for a patient’s medical needs, the design includes pods where doctors work in a common area filled with work stations and computers. Yes, some private doctor offices remain to accommodate circumstances when privacy is important, but the hope is to improve transparency between patient and physician.

The clinic serves as a core location in the hospital with other departments like rehabilitation, laboratory and radiology located in adjacent areas around it. St. Charles is emphasizing a streamlined approach in which they can move patients efficiently through the hospital.

The emergency department includes upgrades that will improve patient privacy. Glass doors and walls close off each room as opposed to the curtains that separate many of the emergency beds at Pioneer Memorial Hospital.

Upstairs, the facility features in-patient rooms that emphasize not only patient comfort, but comfort for the families who are visiting them. Each room includes a couch that folds out to a bed and includes a table for those who need it.

Bottom line is Crook County is getting a major upgrade courtesy of many groups working together. The City of Prineville and Crook County leaders helped the construction process along with assistance from the county building department and city planning and public works. For example, the city completed an arduous sewer line extension this past winter in which they had to dig down more than 20 feet and pump groundwater while running large sewer pipe.

And none of the design and state-of-the-art should be mentioned without acknowledging the Neenan Company, who designed and built the facility.

Hundreds showed up for the “Sneak Peek” and we have to assume that they came away impressed with the new medical facility. We commend St. Charles for their vision and hard work on the massive project. Job well done.

Design of Critical Access Hospital Reflects Oregon Community

Posted on:

Medical Construction & Design

Posted September 14, 2015

St Charles Prineville Exterior Renderings (4)

ENEWSLETTER, PROJECTS

Design of Critical Access Hospital Reflects Oregon Community

FORT COLLINS, Colo. — The Neenan Company recently celebrated the opening of St. Charles Health System’s new 62,000-square-foot critical access hospital, which will replace Pioneer Memorial Hospital in Prineville, Oregon. The official grand opening ceremony took place on Sept. 12.

The Neenan Company served as the Design-Build partner for the project. The new replacement facility includes a primary care medical home at the core, comingled with a critical access hospital. The critical access hospital’s features include an emergency department, imaging and laboratory services, two surgical suites and a procedure room, inpatient beds, physical and respiratory therapy spaces. It was designed to accommodate 12 primary care practitioners and visiting specialists; two onsite residential units were also included for visiting practitioners.

The Neenan Company used a strong thermal envelope and efficient systems to greatly improve the facility’s efficiency in comparison to the systems used in the former facility. Through design, the project team was able to reduce space and staff needs while increasing flexibility and capacity for patient care, at a lesser cost than other design options, by delivering shared ED space, pre- and post-operative space and observation patient rooms. The facility will also equip staff with better tools for diagnosis through use of the new imaging, lab, cardio-pulmonary and physical therapy spaces. The care team space is flexible and adaptable to the ever-changing medical workforce. It allows for different generations of caregivers to work collaboratively while maximizing the benefits of their individual working styles.

The surrounding community is also represented within the design, which incorporates local and regional building materials representative of the textures, materials, colors and aesthetics of the Prineville area.

The Neenan Company recently broke ground on its second project with St. Charles Health System – the addition to and renovation of the St. Charles Madras critical access hospital. The updated facility, located in Madras, Oregon, is scheduled for completion in early 2017. The hospital will improve the utilization of its ED, surgery and imaging by delivering an ED that is three times larger. This added space will allow for a higher volume of surgery, improve access for emergency obstetrics and gynecology in surgery and provide the public with better access to imaging services.

Renderings courtesy of The Neenan Company.

St. Charles Prineville opening soon

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St. Charles Prineville opening soon

New hospital utilizes shared spaces
By Beau Eastes / The Bulletin / @beastes
Published Sep 12, 2015 at 12:01AM
Photographs by Jarob Opperman / The Bulletin

Prineville1 Prineville2 Prineville3
The lobby of Prineville’s new hospital,
St. Charles Prineville on Friday.
Prineville’s new hospital, St. Charles Prineville. The exterior of the new St. Charles Prineville.
Prineville13 Prineville14 Prineville6
The lobby St. Charles Prineville.  The entrance to St. Charles Prineville.  Jeanie Gentry, left, CEO of St. Charles Madras and St. Charles Prineville, shows one of the operating rooms at the new St. Charles Prineville on Friday.
Prineville7 Prineville11 Prineville9
Jeanie Gentry and Miguel Burbano de
Lara, of The Neenan Company, discuss
one of the operating rooms at St. Charles
Prineville on Friday.
Miguel Burbano de Lara, The Neenan Company’s chief architect on the project, explains the physician workstations Friday at St. Charles Prineville. A CT machine at St. Charles Prineville. 
Prineville4 Prineville5 Prineville12
A workout and rehabilitation room in the new St. Charles Prineville. Rooms in the combination surgery and emergency room wing
of St. Charles Prineville.
The media gets a tour Friday of St. Charles Prineville

 

If you go

A public “sneak peek” of St. Charles Prineville is scheduled for today from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. The event will include self-guided tours, food, entertainment and a 5K family
fun run. Interested parties are asked to park at Crook County
High School — shuttles will be provided — as most of the parking space at St. Charles Prineville will be used by event operators.

PRINEVILLE — Health care in Crook County is about to take a giant step forward into the 21st century.

St. Charles Prineville, the new 62,000-square-foot health care center located on the city’s eastern edge, is set to open Sept. 21, replacing Prineville’s 65-year-old Pioneer Memorial Hospital.

The stylish $30 million structure — designed by Colorado-based architecture firm The Neenan Company, whose other projects include New Belgium Brewing’s Fort Collins campus — includes a primary-care center and critical-access hospital within the same building. The new health center is about 20 percent smaller than Pioneer Memorial, said Jeanie Gentry, the CEO of St. Charles Prineville and St. Charles Madras, but through flexible design applications, it should be capable of serving twice as many people as the old hospital.

“We’re thrilled with the new building,” Gentry told a group of media members Friday morning during a press preview tour. “It’s not as big or audacious as the old hospital, and that’s a good thing.”

St. Charles Prineville will house 16 private inpatient rooms, an emergency department, imaging and laboratory services, two surgical suites and an expanded physical and respiratory therapy area. The campus has fewer private offices for medical staff compared to Pioneer Memorial, instead relying more on communal work pods that encourage collaboration between different specialists.

One of the more innovative elements of the building is the combining of the emergency room and the surgical department. The shared space helps reduce staff and space needs, Gentry and The Neenan Company officials said. Additionally, the hospital boasts two onsite residential rooms — think deluxe hotel rooms with a kitchenette — for visiting medical personnel or local health care providers who need to catch some sleep between shifts.

“The triple aim for the health care industry right now is to increase access, improve quality and reduce costs,” said Michael Curtis, vice president of The Neenan Company’s health care division. “Everything we did here was with that in mind.”

Aesthetically, the building has the feel of a ski lodge or hip warehouse district restaurant. The main entrance is flanked by two-story tall windows that illuminate the main communal area with enormous amounts of natural light. Exposed wood and various types of stone pay homage to Prineville’s past as a mill and lumber hub as well as the area’s diverse geological background. The new hospital is built on the site of Ochoco Lumber Company’s former Prineville mill.

The Combs Flat Kitchen, a coffee shop and restaurant which will be open to the public, looks like it was lifted off of Minnesota Avenue in downtown Bend. Local art adorns the walls throughout the hospital, and a pristine white Yamaha grand piano is located on the second floor near the majority of the inpatient rooms. A large circular fireplace that resembles one of Prineville’s historic smokestacks dominates the front lobby.

“The staff (at Pioneer Memorial) asked us to recognize the history of the area,” said Miguel Burbano de Lara, The Neenan Company’s chief architect on the project. “We tried to be very cognitive, to that end, of the land and the mill and a lot of the different kind of stones in the area.”

St. Charles Prineville looks to be the focal point of what could be a new development zone on Prineville’s east side. As part of its sales agreement with Ochoco Lumber Co., St. Charles Health System master-planned
approximately 50 acres near the hospital. Future developments near St. Charles Prineville could include a wellness center, Gentry said. Other options would be various health care-related businesses, such as pharmacies or a natural health clinic.

“We’re thrilled to be the anchor tenant,” Gentry added. “And we’ve got a lot of room to do some other things down the road. There’s space here for a number of different things that would be beneficial to the community.”

— Reporter: 541-617-7829, beastes@bendbulletin.com

The Neenan Company Celebrates Grand Opening of St. Charles Prineville

Posted on:

Cascade Prinville imageThe Neenan Company Celebrates Grand Opening of St. Charles Prineville

By CBN on September 10, 2015 E-Headlines

(St. Charles interior rendering | photo courtesy of the Neenan Company)

The Neenan Company, a fully integrated design-build firm based in Fort Collins, Colo., is pleased to announce the opening of St. Charles Health System’s new 62,000-square-foot critical access hospital, which will replace Pioneer Memorial Hospital in Prineville, Ore. The official grand opening ceremony is scheduled to take place on September 12.

The Neenan Company served as the design-build partner for the project. The new replacement facility includes a primary care medical home at the core, comingled with a critical access hospital. The critical access hospital’s features include an emergency department, imaging and laboratory services, two surgical suites and a procedure room, inpatient beds, physical and respiratory therapy, and was designed to accommodate 12 primary care practitioners and visiting specialists. Two onsite residential units were also included for visiting practitioners.

“The Neenan Company’s primary goal for this project was to deliver a building that enables St. Charles Health System to better perform its essential healthcare services and serve the needs of the surrounding community,” said David Shigekane, president of The Neenan Company. “The new facility was designed to provide a campus that will meet the industry’s and community’s growing needs for years to come.”

The Neenan Company used a strong thermal envelope and efficient systems to greatly improve the facility’s efficiency in comparison to the systems used in the current facility. Through its design, The Company was able to reduce space and staff needs while increasing flexibility and capacity for patient care, at a lesser cost than other design options, by delivering shared emergency department space, pre- and post-operative space, and observation patient rooms.

The facility will equip staff with better tools for diagnosis through use of the new imaging, lab, cardio-pulmonary and physical therapy spaces. The care team space is flexible and adaptable to the ever-changing medical workforce. It allows for different generations of caregivers to work collaboratively while maximizing the benefits of their individual working styles.

The new facility was constructed specifically with the Prineville community in mind. The campus is located on a 20-acre site purchased from Ochoco Lumber Company, and has been transformed into a key community space providing hospital patients and staff with closer access to town than allowed with the current facility’s landlocked position. The facility was designed to be
“right-sized” based on access, population, healthcare needs and caregiver availability.

The surrounding community is represented within the design, which incorporates local and regional building materials representative of the textures, materials, colors and aesthetics of the Prineville area.

The Neenan Company recently broke ground on its second project with St. Charles Health System – the addition to and renovation of the St. Charles Madras critical access hospital. The updated facility, located in Madras is scheduled for completion in early 2017. The hospital will significantly improve the utilization of its emergency department, surgery and imaging by delivering an emergency department that is three times larger. This added space will allow for a higher volume of surgery, improve access for emergency obstetrics and gynecology (OB) in surgery, and provide the public with better access to imaging services.

The Neenan Company is a fully integrated design-build firm that specializes in the architecture and construction of commercial, education and healthcare facilities throughout the United States. The firm is based in Colorado and was a 2013 recipient of the national American Business Ethics Award.

www.neenan.com

Ribbon-cutting opens new school

Posted on:

Ribbon-cutting opens new school

By Lyndsie Ferrell in The Mineral County Miner on Aug. 20, 2015

CREEDE- A large crowd of community members and visitors gathered in front of the new school in Creede to witness the ribbon-cutting ceremony on Saturday, Aug. 15.

After almost a year and a half of construction, the community was finally able to walk through the doors of their new school and see what their combined efforts had brought to the area. School Board President John Howard addressed the crowd speaking on behalf of the school to thank everyone in the community for passing the bond when it came time to vote.

The old school was built in 1949 and has served the community until the building began to show signs of age. Potentially hazardous issues such as radon gas leaks and dangerous building materials were a concern for the safety of the students and staff. In 2013 school board members reached out to the community and asked for their help to fix the situation. When elections rolled around in November, the bill 3A was passed, and plans for the new school shifted into high gear.

Many of construction costs were taken care of due to the school being approved for the BEST grant that has helped build new schools state-wide . Howard did not forget to point out that though the BEST grant helped pay for the new school, it was the community in Creede that made the dream come true. With the help of Neenan Company out of Fort Collins, the building was made into a 21st Century, energy-efficient design that fits into the community it will be serving. Superintendent Buck Stroh thanked the community and the owner representative from Consillium Partners, Desi Navarro, who helped guide board members and the community through the many construction phases and everything that pertained to the new school.

Colorado Senator Larry Crowder was in attendance to present a Colorado flag and an American flag to the new school. “What this does is signify the fabric of the community,” said Crowder. The senator then gave the flags to Howard and thanked everyone for their continued support in helping educate the children in Mineral County for the 21st Century.

The building’s low profile and natural colors of outside surfaces helps the school blend into the vast mountain valley south of town. The position of the building’s entrances and windows were chosen in order to provide the most natural light throughout the day, cutting down on energy expenses. Window shades follow the rays of the sun by solar power and shift according to the time of day, in order to utilize the most natural light.

Walking into the school is a new experience all together. The front entryway was designed for safety and convenience, giving the front desk staff the chance to see who is entering the building something the office staff has never had before. While entering the front entryway a door leads off to the right, allowing the public access to the school/county library. The library is now connected with the Carnegie Library system in the Valley, giving library patrons and students access to thousands of books and programs.

The main part of the building is taken up by the community/lunch room. The high ceilings and open spaces, give a sense of being outside while inside. Students will have the opportunity to enjoy the room during school activities and lunch hours. The room is also equipped with a concession stand built into the far right corner where students and staff will be able to sell snacks for fundraisers, sporting events or other school activities.

Classrooms are equipped with dividers in the event the student population grows. The large classrooms can be divided into two smaller rooms if the need arises. The gym is also equipped with a divider, making it easy to host two games or sport practices at the same time. Hallways are lined with wooden accents providing a natural feel to the building. High windows are placed strategically throughout the halls to once again provide natural light. Flat screen TVs are set throughout the building in study nooks and can be used to refer to news, movies and informational pieces.

Students and staff gathered in a line near the door to their new school. Small hands held the ribbon on each side, while Howard donned the gigantic scissors to cut the ribbon and welcome the community insdie. Gratitude and excitement could be seen in the eyes of the students and staff as Howard cut the ribbon and opened the doors. The day was bright and clear and was soon filled with the laughter of children racing toward their new playground.

St. Charles Madras project underway

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The Madras Pioneer | August 2015

St. Charles Madras project underway

Written by Holy M. Gill

$16 million renovation, addition

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ILLUSTRATION BY NEENAN CO. – The new entrance for St. Charles Madras will be on the east side of the building.

For nearly a decade, hospital officials — first from Mountain View Hospital, and more recently from St. Charles Madras — have been planning a major renovation at the local hospital.

Last week, the hospital finally broke ground on a $16 million project, which will include construction of a 21,737-square-foot addition, renovation of portions of the hospital, and an extension of the parking area.

The addition will feature a new emergency room, surgery department and imaging area, as well as a new entrance, increasing the hospital from 56,964 square feet to 78,701 square feet.

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HOLLY M. GILL – The eight participants in the groundbreaking for St. Charles Madras’ addition and renovation project last week included, from left: Michael Collins, of the Neenan Co.; Mack Gardner and Dan Schuette, St. Charles board members; Jeanie Gentry, St. Charles Madras CEO; Joe Sluka, St. Charles Health System CEO; Angel Davis, of the hospital’s nutrition department; and Greg Arquette, of Warm Springs, who provided Native American music for the event.

The hospital still has only one operating room, and the emergency room has only seven beds, separated by curtains, according to Jeanie Gentry, St. Charles Madras CEO. “We need probably double that.”

The imaging room is too small, and the lab is still located outside the hospital in a modular unit, she said, adding, “We’re finally breaking ground on something that’s going to address all those needs.”

Seven of the St. Charles Health System board members and the CEO, Joe Sluka, were on hand for the groundbreaking, as well as Michael Curtis, the vice president for health care for the Neenan Co., of Denver, Colo., Mountain View Hospital board members, hospital employees and community members.”

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HOLLY M. GILL – Michael Curtis

It isn’t so much a building project as it is a patient care project,” Gentry told those gathered for the Aug. 18 event.

The project will more than fulfill a key component of the asset transfer agreement between Mountain View Hospital and St. Charles Madras, which took effect Jan. 1, 2013, requiring St. Charles Health System to spend at least $10 million on hospital improvements.

“St. Charles has also invested a lot into the current building,” said Gentry. “When it’s done, we will have had an infusion of $20 million into our community.”

The Neenan Co., of Fort Collins, Colo., will serve as the architect and general contractor for the project, as it has on the new St. Charles Prineville hospital, which will open its doors Sept. 21, the same day Pioneer Memorial Hospital closes its doors.

Like that project, Gentry anticipates that about 25 percent of the workers on the St. Charles Madras project will also be local.

Construction will start inside the hospital, as the old rehabilitation therapy pool is converted into a new mechanical room.

“One of the next things is the maintenance shop in the back of the hospital has to be moved,” said Gentry. “It’s right on top of where part of the new building will be.”

The entire project is expected to be completed in about 18 months, which would mean early 2017.

When it’s complete, the main entrance for the hospital will be located on the east side, with access from Northeast A Street, while the ambulance entrance will be located on the west side, off Northeast 12th Street.